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Squire Plus 2 Troubleshooting Center

 
 

ISSUES With your Squire Plus 2? We're here to help.  

The Squire Plus 2 is our most popular machine, which also makes it our most common tech call.  This guide will help take you through some of the most common issues and fixes we come across.  

1. Check your Utilities

2. Machine Settings and Practices

3. FAQs/Common Issues

4. Fill by Weight

 


1. CHECK YOUR UTILITIES

90%+ of tech calls are caused by improper service connections.  Before you go any further, verify all utility conenctions on your machien.  Low pressures, low flow rates, and underpowered electrical connections are more common than all other issues combined.  Here is a list of the proper service connections for the SQP2.  We'll go through it one-by-one and make sure your machine services are within spec:

1) CO2/N2 Supply: Inert gas should be supplied at 30 psig, through a large enough hose and regulator to maintain that pressure at all times during the sequence, including purges.  

2) Air (purge): Air should be supplied at 22 psig, through a large enough hose and regulator to maintain that pressure at all times during the sequence, including purges.  Too low of an air pressure can delay the sequence.  Too high of a pressure can interfere with the keg valve and prevent the sequence from proceeding. 

3) Water (keg rinse): Water should be supplied to the keg rinse line at 55 psig to ensure smooth chemical dosing.  This line also features the in-line dosing unit for Oxine sanitizer (conneciton 9).  There is no requirement for water hardness, beyond what might interfere with certain sanitizers.  Consult with your chemical supplier.

4) Water (detergent tank): Water should be supplied to the detergent inlet at 55 psig to ensure smooth chemical dosing.  There is no requirement for water hardness, beyond what might interfere with the efficacy of certain brands of detergent.  Consult with your chemical supplier.

5) Air (controls): Controls air should be supplied at 80 psi, through a large enough hose and regulator to maintain that pressure at all times during the sequence.  Controls air has to be completely dry and clean.  Too high of a pressure can damage control components.  Too low of a pressure can prevent valves from opening or closing and can halt the sequence.

6) Electricity: The electrical connection for the Squire is 240VAC, single phase, at 60 Hz.  It's maximum consumption with all components active is 35A.  Undervoltage can cause high currents that can trip the machine's internal overloads or damage electrical components.

7) Caustic:  Caustic detergent should be supplied to the dosing unit such that the final detergent concentration is 2-3% by volume.  Dosing rates can be adjusted by changing out the metering tips included with the unit.  A guide to the in-line dosing units and tips can be found here.  Because final dosing is affected by a number of factors, we suggest titration to determine the actual appropriate dosing rate.   Caustic should be sodium hydroxide (caustic soda), which is generally purchased in bulk liquid form at 50% by weight.

8) Product: Product should be provided from the bright tank with a tank head pressure of 15 psig.  

9) Activated Oxine: Activated Oxine should be provided to the dosing unit such that final concentration is between 50-100 ppm, depending on antimicrobial needs.  

10) Acid: Acid detergent should be supplied to the dosing unit such that the final concentration is 0.5-1% by volume.  Dosing rates can be adjusted by changing out the metering tips included with the unit.  A guide to the in-line dosing units and tips can be found here.  Because final dosing is affected by a number of factors, we suggest titration to determine the actual appropriate dosing rate.  Acid used for detergent cycles should generally be food-grade phosphoric, nitric, or a blend of the two.  

11) This hose barb is provided so that the operator doesn't have to routinely disassemble any fittings on connection (12) to CIP the fill side.  The barb accepts any standard 3/4" N/B hose supplied by the customer that meets the required temperature, pressure, and chemical resistance.

12)  The fill drain should have no more than 5 feet of hose directly attached to its end, to prevent flow restriction.  For long runs across the production floor to the drain, we suggest running a short hose from the fill drain into a 3 or 4" PVC pipe that runs to the drain.


2. MACHINE SETTINGS AND PRACTICES

Once you've verified your utilities, you should double check your settings, accessories, and practices on the Squire.  Off-brand couplers, incorrect scavenge procedures, and low back-pressure settings are all common problems that are easy to fix.

1) Keg Couplers:

IDD machines its own wash/fill couplers to meet the sealing and flow specifications for the Squire series.  Off-brand couplers are generally designed for dispensing -- not CIP -- and don't provide enough exit flow to rapidly wash or fill kegs.  Common problems from off-brand couplers include stalled or slowed cycles and premature cycle termination.  

Keg coupler seals also don't last forever.  Loose or rolled seals can cause stalled or slowed cycles by blocking the outlet port.  Loose seals can also leak enough liquid to trip the liquid sensor and prematurely end cycles.  

2) Back-pressure setting:

The back-pressure regulator for the Squire Plus 2 fill-side is located on the left hand side of the detergent reservoir.  It provides air to the pinch valve on the exit drain to maintain pressure during the fill.  Setting it too low will cause foam breakout during the fill and end the sequence prematurely.  Setting it too high will slow or stall the fill.  The factory generally sets the regulator to 30-35 psi as a starting point, but it's up to the operator to find the ideal setting for their machine.

3) Scavenging:

After the fill sequence is completed, excess beer in the fill line can be recovered or purged using the scavenge button.  This function sends a blast of CO2 through the fill line and out of the drain.  To do so, disengage the coupler handle but leave it in the neck of the keg.  Then press the scavenge button.  Scavenging with the coupler engaged will start to empty the filled keg.

4) Detergent Temperature:

Caustic detergent cycles should be run at 130-150F.  Acid detergent cycles are generally run from 100-150F.  Detergent temperature should never exceed 150F.  


3. FAQs/Common Issues

Q: When I try and fill a keg, the sequence ends before the keg is full.

A: The fill sequence of the Squire Plus 2 ends when the IR probe embedded in the fill drain detects liquid (or, if a Fill by Weight is present, when the preset weight is reached).  Make sure the keg coupler is depressed.  If the sequence is stopping before the keg is full, there's a strong chance that liquid is leaking into the drain line or the probe is misbehaving.  Some possible culprits: 

a) Dirty IR Probe: The IR probe in the drain line has a tendency to accumulate film from dirt beers over time.  Sometimes, all one has to do it remove the probe (it's threaded in), wipe it off with a clean rag, and replace it.  The probe's light should be on when the pipe is empty, and off when the pipe is full.  

b) Insufficient scavenging:  The scavenge on the SQP2 helps to drain the hoses of beer.  If something is wrong with the scavenge, beer residue can remain in the lines and trip the IR probe prematurely.  See the manual for the proper scavenge procedure.

c) Leaky Fill Coupler: If the fill coupler's gaskets aren't sealing properly, due to wear or misuse, small amounts of product can bypass the keg and travel straight into the exit line.  This liquid can trip the liquid probe.  Make sure the coupler is being attached as firmly as possible, and that all seals are intact and functioning.

d) Low back-pressure: Low back-pressure can cause CO2 breakout and foaming, which can exit the keg and trip the probe.  Confirm that the back-pressure regulator is set to at least 35 psig and remains constant during the cycle.    


Q: When I try and fill a keg, the sequence never ends.

A:  Make sure the product pump is on.  Make sure that the fill drain valve is open and indicating, the drain path is unobstructed, and no significant hose length is providing resistance to flow.  This problem can be caused by a lot of different things, so we'll need examine more evidence:

i) The racker drain valve is not showing the yellow indicator:

Check to see that the "R. Drain" solenoid under the control panel is showing a red light. If not, the solenoid is disconnected or has gone bad.  If the solenoid is fine, verify a constant 80 psi of control air pressure.  Check to make sure the pneumatic line is connected to the valve and that air is flowing through it.  The process valve itself may need service or replacement.

ii) If the kegs fill all the way up and liquid beer is pouring out of the fill drain without stopping:

Check the IR liquid probe to make sure its connected and functioning. The light on the top should be on when the pipe is empty, and off when the pipe is full.

iii) The product pump is running, but the keg remains empty:

Verify all utilities.  Abnormal CO2 or air pressure can interfere with the keg valve.  Make sure the racker drain and product valves are open and indicating, the drain path is unobstructed, and no significant hose length is providing resistance to flow.  Verify that your coupler seals are intact and haven't rolled over the exit port.  Your coupler may need service or replacement.